Didling Church

Didling Church SussexThe Shepherd’s Church, Didling

St Andrew’s Church, Didling, West Sussex. Didling Church (also known as The Shepherd’s Church) sits alone on the side of The South Downs in West Sussex. Dating back to the 13th Century the church has changed very little in centuries.

Here are a few photos:

Didling Church Sussex

 

Didling Church Sussex

Didling Church Sussex

Didling Church Sussex

Didling Church Sussex

Didling Church Sussex

Didling Church Sussex

Didling Church Sussex

Miranda Kate Ottewill

Miranda Kate Ottewill

We found a message written on the wall behind some wallpaper at our house – a message to the future from someone called Miranda Kate Ottewill.

Miranda wrote “This house is called Bepton Grange. It is shared between Mrs Bourne and us, ‘The Ottewills’. Miss Carnick once lived here but has just died and we have inherited her cat ‘Tibbles’. If anyone finds this they will know it has been written by Miranda Kate Ottewill. Miranda Ottewill – we have your message. Are you out there???

Bedham Church

Abandoned church in Bedham

Just along the road near Petworth is the remains of a settlement called Bedham.

I’d heard about Bedham Church ruins and decided to take a look. The abandoned Victorian chapel nestles at the side of a lane near Fittleworth in West Sussex – but you could easily drive past and not notice it.

Built in 1880, the church was built by William Townley Mitford – the Member of Parliament for Midhurst – and dedicated to Saint Michael and All Angels. Back in the 1870s religious morals and education were considered vital for the rural communities in the Sussex Weald, and many buildings were erected to serve as both schoolrooms and places of worship.

At one time the school had 60 pupils and 3 teachers, but by the end of the First World War the building was falling into neglect and closed as a school in 1925. For a while the building still operated as a church, but in 1959 it was abandoned completely.

Cocking Limeworks

Photos of Cocking Limeworks

Just south of Cocking, tucked out of sight beside the A286 is an old Limeworks and Brickworks dating back to the 1830s.

The works was abandoned in the late 1990s but the site remains pretty much intact. To look around you’ll need to climb though a collapsed fence with a sign stating ‘Danger Keep Out’ (I only noticed the sign on the way out) but once inside it’s incredible. The site is pretty much as it was on the day it was abandoned; a lorry parked up, desks and furniture in offices, storerooms and machine rooms, conveyor belts and pallets of lime…

In its final years the limeworks produced lime and chalk for agriculture and nurseries called ‘Calco’ and ‘Nurslim’. The lime and chalk was extracted from the quarry at the top of the hill and then processed through various crushers before being milled and fired in one of the eight huge lime kilns built into the side of a quarry dating back two or three centuries.

Nature is taking over Cocking limeworks; it’s a delightful juxtaposition between dereliction and regeneration, and well worth a nosey-around if you can.

Here’s a plan of the site from a website called The Derelict Miscellany:

Plan_of_cocking_limeworks

Where is Cocking Limeworks?

Cocking Limeworks is just south of the village of Cocking in West Sussex, hidden in the woods on the left hand side of the A286. There’s no parking.

And a very good description of how the limeworks operated can be found here.